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Archive for the ‘Archives and Special Collections’ Category

This month we say goodbye to our archivist as she moves on to the next stage of her career. She taught us many things, including how much fun cookbooks are and how these books have historical research value.

 

Cookbooks are a valuable historical source because “the study of culinary history isn’t about food – it’s about the people who prepare and consume this food.” (Sarah Lohman. Eight flavors: the untold story of American cuisine. New York: Simon & Schuster, 2016, p. xvii.

 

Below is a list of cookbooks (or cookery as the library catalog calls them) found in the Chilson Collection in the Archives and Special Collections. The books are listed from newest to oldest.

 

South Dakota’s governors residence cookbook: a culinary legacy celebrating the first families of South Dakota. Kearney, NE: Morris Press Cookbooks, 2007.

 

Gueldner, R. M. H. German food & folkways: heirloom memories from Europe, South Russia & the Great Plains. Fargo, ND: Germans from Russian Heritage Collection, North Dakota State University Libraries, 2002.

 

Spuka Sni Win. Lakota traditional and contemporary recipes. Pine Ridge, S.D.: Spuka Sni Win, 1999.

 

Luchetti, Cathy. Home on the range: a culinary history of the American West. New York: Villard Books, 1993.

 

Young, Kay. Wild seasons: gathering and cooking wild plants of the Great Plains. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 1993.

 

Walker, Barbara M. The Little House cookbook: frontier foods from Laura Ingalls Wilder’s classic stories. New York: Harper & Row, 1979.

 

Grandma’s cookbook: pioneering recipes of Northeastern South Dakota. Watertown, S. D.: Friends of the Kampeska Heritage Museum, 1976.

 

The homestead cookbook: for home and family use. Seattle: Superior Pub. Co., 1976.

 

Kreidberg, Marjorie. Food on the frontier: Minnesota cooking from 1850 to 1900, with selected recipes. St. Paul: Minnesota Historical Society Press, 1975.

 

Marquiss, Toots. Buffalo cook book. Rapid City, S. D.: Crane Publ. Co., Inc., 1972.

 

Century Czech recipes of Tabor community: Tabor, South Dakota. Tabor, S.D.: [1972?].

 

McGovern, Eleanor. The Eleanor McGovern cookbook: a collection of South Dakota family favorites. Mitchell, S.D.: Citizens for McGovern, [ca. 1970].

 

Beeton, (Isabella Mary). The book of household management. New York: Farrar, Straus, and Giroux, 1969.

 

Adams, Ramon F. Come an’ get it; the story of the old cowboy cook. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, [1952].

 

Another year with Your Neighbor Lady. Sioux City and Yankton: Radio Station WNAX, 1949.

 

Robinson, Eva Roberta. The timely cookbook. Aberdeen: South Dakota Food Administration, 1918.

 

Good things to eat and how to prepare them: over two hundred choice recipes. Buffalo, N.Y.: Larkin Co., 1906.

 

Help one another cook book. Aberdeen: Dakota farmer, [19??].

 

If you want to do research using local cookbooks, The Hilton M. Briggs Library at South Dakota State University is currently collecting cookbooks created by South Dakota schools, churches, hospitals, families, and other organizations. They are displaying them online as the South Dakota Community Cookbook Collection on the SDSU site Open Prairie.

 

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Was a professor from the University of South Dakota, Dr. Marjorie Eastwood Dudley (1891-1961), the first woman in America to write a symphony for a major orchestra? (The South Dakotan, November 1977, p. 3) It would be fun to find what symphony she wrote and for which orchestra. Maybe the answer is in her papers, which were at the Archives and Special Collections but now reside at the National Music Museum.

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Image from USD Photograph Collection

 

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The Archives and Special Collections will be open its regular hours except for:

Dec. 23 – early closing at noon
Dec. 26 – closed all day
Jan. 2 – closed all day

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The Osborne Collection of Early English Children’s books, were donated by Edgar Osborne, to the Toronto Public Library after he visited the library in 1934. He was so impressed with their children’s program that he donated 2,000 books to the library. Since then the collection has grown into a large collection of over 80,000 children’s books. The Osborne collection is just one of three collections in the libraries children program. Those books that are a part of the Osborne Collection have parameters that require them to have been printed before 1910.

The facsimile collection of Osborne books is made up of 35 books published in 1981. The University of South Dakota houses all 35 books with in its Special Collection, in the Archives and Special Collections. An interesting fact about the books is that they were printed in the same manner as the originals. So if pages are printed blank, like they are in A Book of Nonsense then that is the way they were meant to be printed.

Many of the books within the collection are interactive. The Mansion of Bliss is in fact not a book but a spiral board game that was meant to improve one’s moral values. The game was one of chance, in which 2-4 players were racing one another to see who could make it to the mansion of bliss first. Along with the game is a rule book that explains each space and whether the player who landed there will be punished or rewarded.

Come and enjoy viewing the Facsimile Osborne Collection of Early English Children’s Books, now on display up in the USD Archives.

Bibliography

Toronto Public Library. “Osborne Collection of Early Children’s Books.” Copyright 2016. http://www.torontopubliclibrary.ca/osborne/ [accessed October 19, 2016].

Dunedin Public Libraries. “Osborne Collection of Early Children’s Books.” Julian Smith, August 13, 2015. Copyright 2016. https://hail.to/dunedin-public-libraries/article/D1lQo6S [accessed October 19, 2016].

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To me every trip to a library or archive is like a small detective story. There are always little moments on such trips when the past flares to life, like a match in the darkness.

Larson, Erik. The devil in the white city: murder, magic, and madness at the fair that changed America. New York: Crown Publishers, 2003, 395-396.

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Here are a few helpful tips for the lucky ones visiting an archives.

  • Give yourself enough time. Looking through archival collections is time-consuming, and you will need more time than you expect. Believe me.
  • Check with the archival staff beforehand and ask them a lot of questions. Will they be open the days you want to visit? Are there other collections you should look at? Read through the three sources at the end of this blog for more questions.
  • Learn as much as possible before you get to the archives about the collections you want to access. Are there finding aids and how do you can get copies of these finding aids? Are there restrictions on the collections you want to use for research?
  • If you want to see a book in the archives, bring more with you than the call number. Often the person pulling the book from the closed stacks needs to know information from the entire catalog record, such as book size and number of pages, before they know where a book is stored.
  • Keep track of what you have looked at and keep track of information that you will need for citations. Write it down.
  • Bonus tip: If visiting us, ask to see our copy of Reading early American handwriting by Kip Sperry. It can help decipher handwritten documents.

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See also:

 

 

Introduction to Archival Research, Lisa Duncan, httpn://libguides.usd.edu/cotent.php?pid=691519 (accessed August 24, 2016).

 

Top 5 Mistakes Researchers Make in the Research Room, https://historyhub.archives.gov/groups/new-researchers-help/blog/2016/07 (accessed August 19, 2016).

 

Using Archives: a guide to effective research, Society of American Archivist, http://www2.archivists.org/usingarchives (accessed August 19, 2016).

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Tomorrow is the official 2016 Dakota Day’s Parade on Main Street @ 9 a.m. Go Yotes!

–USD Photograph Collection, Series 11

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