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Archive for the ‘Archives and Special Collections’ Category

Archives and Special Collections will be closed for renovation/expansion from May 14th, 2021 to January 01, 2022. Patron services will be limited.

If you need additional information please contact the Archives at speccoll@usd.edu.

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The Story of the Coyote: A Visual History of USD Athletics was curated by Leah Dusterhoft, BFA Fine Arts – Graphic Design ’21 as part of an art history independent study course taught by Art History Professor Dr. Lauren Freese. Dusterhoft is a USD Student-athlete, throwing the discus for the track and field team during her time at USD. Since the fall of 2019, she has worked as a graphic design intern for the Sports Information Department, making graphics for social media.

The exhibition is on view through August 6th in the I.D. Weeks Library, 2nd floor.

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Recently added to the Archives and Special Collections website are instructions for navigating and searching through finding aids on ArchivesSpace:

The Archives and Special Collections department is moving our Richardson Collection finding aids to ArchivesSpace. Though the physical location and the format of the finding aids are changing, you can continue to access the finding aids through the Archives and Special Collections website.

We also added to our website instructions for navigating and searching in ArchivesSpace. The instructions can be found by clicking on the line “Finding Aids (collection guides)” on our website.

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and that the Archives and Special Collections is not a scary place.

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to USD’s COVID-19 Experiences Project?

Coronavirus, Globe, Flags, World, Nations, Disease

Don’t be shy. I will let you read two of my less-than-great haikus,, written at different stages of the pandemic:

 

Ha, TP hoarding

Funny until you run out

Shelves are still empty

 

Please don’t come near me

Your breath and touch dangerous

I so want to live

 

 

 

 

 

 

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To inspire us, this “Library Work” poster from the American Library Association is hanging up in the Archives and Special Collections.  ALA believes the poster is from 1926.

library-poster001

library-poster002-cropped

Used with permission from the American Library Association.

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There is a new display outside of the Archives and Special Collections. It features a Black Hills map by Amos Bad Heart Bull and a Black Hills tourist map.

black-hills-2-cropped black-hills-1-cropped

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SP- ArchivesLook at the wonderful graphic that Tasha from our Technology Department created for us.

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The national woman suffrage story ultimately became a success because of the success of suffragists at the state and local levels. Next year, as we celebrate a century since the ratification of the 19th Amendment, it is important to remember the significance of the state and local stories as well.

Simultaneously the most fun and most frustrating part of designing this display was choosing which items to include. The Jane Breeden, Mamie Pyle and Gladys Pyle papers contained a wealth of fascinating items. These collections worked well together to provide different perspectives of the suffrage movement. As a leading suffragist in South Dakota, Mamie Pyle’s papers provided an insight into the “business” end of the movement, while Jane Breeden’s papers gave a non-leadership perspective. Although active in the suffrage movement herself, Gladys Pyle’s papers were important to show that women were not just capable of using the vote, but they were more than capable of pursuing political office all the way to Washington D.C.

Organizing the display by theme seemed a much better way to put the items in conversation with one another. Highlighting the reoccuring elements of democracy, wartime, anti-suffragist and citizenship, it was clear that the history of the suffrage movement was not exclusively a women’s story. There were so many interesting and sometimes absurd pieces; I hope at the very least, those who are interested in the woman suffrage movement will take the time to visit the Archives and Special Collections at USD.

Although many of the items on display can be accessed through the Digital Library of South Dakota (DLSD), a trip to USD’s Archives and Special Collections is unparalleled. Sure, you can peruse these collections from the comfort of your own armchair, but the reading room has comfortable seating, a welcoming atmosphere and a superb staff waiting for you to bring in your research questions.

Interning at A&SC has been a rewarding experience. Honestly, it was a little like going on a treasure hunt, and every time I entered the stacks, I found something new. There were a few projects that I worked on through the semester, but the opportunity to put together a display on woman suffrage was by far my favorite.

My hope with this display is that it will encourage visitors to further explore these manuscript collections for the items that had to reluctantly be returned to the stacks and to contemplate how some of the issues presented in the display remain relevant today.


Information and items from:

Richardson Collection, Archives and Special Collections, the University of South Dakota

  • the Mamie Shields Pyle Papers
  • the Gladys Pyle Papers
  • the Jane Rooker Breeden papers

Chilson Collection, Archives and Special Collections, the University of South Dakota

  • Lahlum, Lori Ann and Molly P. Rozum. Equality at the Ballot Box: Votes for Women on the Northern Great Plains. Pierre, SD: South Dakota Historical Society Press, 2019.

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