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Archive for the ‘Archives and Special Collections’ Category

Come visit us and check out the view from our new space in the library at the University of South Dakota.

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Veronica Knippling

            What happens to a collection after it is donated to the Archives? Thousands of papers, receipts, envelopes, tickets, and magazines came to me in folders, stacked in boxes, and initially overwhelmed me. I had never received an assignment such as this prior to being honored as a U.Discover Scholar. As a student, I encounter secondary sources in the form of journal articles all the time, but it’s rare to come across a primary source, even in digital format. To have 13 boxes full of primary source material to sort through has been a challenge, but a fruitful one. The more I’ve learned about Wilber Stilwell, the morepassionate I’ve become about my job as a researcher. 

            I started sorting through the boxes, folder by folder, page by page. I was quickly familiarized to a name that I’ve heard often during my time here at the University of South Dakota: Wilber Stilwell. Wilber was a professor and Department Chair at USD for over 30 years, but that’s only the beginning of his story and legacy. 

            To start establishing points of interest, I bookmarked information that piqued my curiosity, all the while trying to develop a greater understanding of Wilber. He won a Medal of Honor, hand gifted to him from Lady Bird Johnson, for his dedication to art education. Where did this passion for art education begin? Wilber was an enthusiastic inventor. What planted the seed of innovation? I wished to see the bigger picture. 

            After this part of the project, comes the digitization process. Each folder will be described to ensure efficient search and retrieval efforts for scholars and researchers who wish to consult the “Stilwell Papers” as a resource. Whether they are interested in Wilber as a Regionalist artist, or an educator, or the inventor of the “Safe-T-Scissors,” they will be able to find it with the click of some buttons. Prior to this project, the “Stilwell Papers” were thousands of pages without descriptors, difficult to navigate with any certainty. With the description and digitization process, those who wish to utilize the resource will be able to do so much more efficiently.

            All the while, I have kept a meticulous research journal, developing my premature ideas as more concrete themes. The four to arise are Wilber as an Educator, Advocate, Inventor, and Artist. In future blog posts, I will describe each of these themes with more detail, telling the story of Wilber Stilwell. Keep an eye out!

            An opportunity that has truly helped my research blossom is the U.Discover Summer Scholar Program, which is open for application to all undergraduate students. The grant provides a generous stipend and freedom to conduct your research as necessary. Research was very intimidating to me before this process, until I was encouraged by my faculty mentor, Dr. Lauren Freese, to step out of the box. I had preconceptions about what research needed to look like. I was pleasantly surprised to unveil the possibilities that this grant can cover.

            This isn’t to say that this summer hasn’t proven to be a challenge; it certainly has. Time management, critical thinking, and creativity have been skills that I have had to develop more thoroughly. Connecting the dots between the different milestones of Wilber’s life has been difficult, but so worthwhile. I feel like I’ve jumped into a time machine and been dropped into a tumultuous period of uncertainty; filled with war, societal disparities, a lack of appreciation for educators, and a difficult state economy. I’ve been able to develop a greater appreciation not only for Wilber, but for all educators, past and present, who have made my time at USD possible and enjoyable. 

#ASummerOfStilwell

Here’s a link to the finding aid for the collection I’m researching.

https://archives.usd.edu/repositories/2/resources/99

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Archives and Special Collections will be closed for renovation/expansion from May 14th, 2021 to January 01, 2022. Patron services will be limited.

If you need additional information please contact the Archives at speccoll@usd.edu.

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The Story of the Coyote: A Visual History of USD Athletics was curated by Leah Dusterhoft, BFA Fine Arts – Graphic Design ’21 as part of an art history independent study course taught by Art History Professor Dr. Lauren Freese. Dusterhoft is a USD Student-athlete, throwing the discus for the track and field team during her time at USD. Since the fall of 2019, she has worked as a graphic design intern for the Sports Information Department, making graphics for social media.

The exhibition is on view through August 6th in the I.D. Weeks Library, 2nd floor.

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Recently added to the Archives and Special Collections website are instructions for navigating and searching through finding aids on ArchivesSpace:

The Archives and Special Collections department is moving our Richardson Collection finding aids to ArchivesSpace. Though the physical location and the format of the finding aids are changing, you can continue to access the finding aids through the Archives and Special Collections website.

We also added to our website instructions for navigating and searching in ArchivesSpace. The instructions can be found by clicking on the line “Finding Aids (collection guides)” on our website.

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and that the Archives and Special Collections is not a scary place.

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to USD’s COVID-19 Experiences Project?

Coronavirus, Globe, Flags, World, Nations, Disease

Don’t be shy. I will let you read two of my less-than-great haikus,, written at different stages of the pandemic:

 

Ha, TP hoarding

Funny until you run out

Shelves are still empty

 

Please don’t come near me

Your breath and touch dangerous

I so want to live

 

 

 

 

 

 

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To inspire us, this “Library Work” poster from the American Library Association is hanging up in the Archives and Special Collections.  ALA believes the poster is from 1926.

library-poster001

library-poster002-cropped

Used with permission from the American Library Association.

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There is a new display outside of the Archives and Special Collections. It features a Black Hills map by Amos Bad Heart Bull and a Black Hills tourist map.

black-hills-2-cropped black-hills-1-cropped

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