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"Methode de violon" Pierre Baillot

“Methode de violon” Pierre Baillot

The Archives and Special Collections has recently digitized Pierre Baillot’s Methode de violon from the Mahoney Music Collection. This French treatise was published in 1793 with contributions from Pierre Rode and Rodolphe Kreutzer. It can be viewed, with a number of other treatises from the collection, on the Digital Library of South Dakota.

http://dlsd.sdln.net/cdm/

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Being new to the game of archives and special collections, I have found myself thrown into the whirl of dig specs, local subjects, date hidden, date original, and many other fields that I am to decode from yearbooks and faces and, with luck, information written on the sleeve of the negative. This job has taken me and transported me to a different time in USD history as well as a different time in the scheme of history. The identification of images and more importantly faces was a skill that I was unfamiliar with; looking for certain facial markers and hairlines is something that at first I thought was easy because, scientifically speaking, everyone has a unique face, but being thrust into the 1950’s looking at faces in sometimes blurry yearbook photos has given me a new appreciation for the Digital Library of South Dakota (http://dlsd.sdln.net/)  and how many photos have been identified. One photo that really gave me a run for my money was this one of Mary Mumford- Miss Dakota 1953 and Don Elgert of KUSD. Luckily 1954 was written on the sleeve, giving me some bearing as to where to start. F Second  finding out who Mary was was somewhat of a challenge, she kept showing up in photos different places around USD and so I went hunting in the 1954 yearbook and lo and behold I found her. Then came to the man sitting next to her smiling brightly, I then went through the sports section thinking maybe he was a football player and they were sweethearts or maybe he was from a fraternity. After that I sat puzzled as to who this mystery man was. AHA! I then thought of the KUSD team. Lucky strike! A man with a similar hairline and jawline was pictured speaking into the microphone with a group of other young ladies. But I was unsure as to if for certain these two photos were of the same gentlemen. First look is the hairline as well as the part in the hair-a match. Second, is the eyebrows, shape, thickness, color, and arch-an almost match, but the expression was different in the photos giving the eyebrows different shapes and arches. Then I moved onto exposed wrists or ankles-weird I know-but they are easy to identify and are unique to individuals-a match. But I still had an air of hesitance to call this man Don Elgert. Something just did not seem to click in my mind, there was a red flag going off somewhere in my mind. The identification of this image came down to the curvature of his ear-the curve of the helix, shape of the lobe, as well as the shape of the conch were perfect matches. I was hunched over the 1954 yearbook, magnifying glass in hand, intently comparing ear shape between the computer screen and book. To the outsider I must have look like a lunatic, but it can come down to the shape of the ear when identifying images. But as I settle into my job as a metadata enterer-fancy sounding I know-I find that looking insane and getting frustrated all lead to getting a solid identification of an image, which at the end of the day is what it is all about.  Happy identifying, Sophia

Being new to the game of archives and special collections, I have found myself thrown into the whirl of digi specs, local subjects, date hidden, date original, and many other fields that I am to decode from yearbooks and faces and, with luck, information written on the sleeve of the negative. This job has taken me and transported me to a different time in USD history as well as a different time in the scheme of history. The identification of images and more importantly faces was a skill that I was unfamiliar with; looking for certain facial markers and hairlines is something that at first I thought was easy because, scientifically speaking, everyone has a unique face, but being thrust into the 1950’s looking at faces in sometimes blurry yearbook photos has given me a new appreciation for the Digital Library of South Dakota (http://dlsd.sdln.net/) and how many photos have been identified. One photo that really gave me a run for my money was this one of Mary Mumford- Miss Dakota 1953 and Don Egert of KUSD. Luckily 1954 was written on the sleeve, giving me some bearing as to where to start. Second finding out who Mary was somewhat of a challenge, she kept showing up in photos different places around USD and so I went hunting in the 1954 yearbook and lo and behold I found her in the warm gray pages, smiling brightly for her glamor shot. Then came to the man sitting next to her smiling brightly, I then went through the sports section thinking maybe he was a football player and they were sweethearts or maybe he was from a fraternity. After that I sat puzzled as to who this mystery man was, then the background of the photo came into focus for me, those tiles on the walls looked oddly familiar to ones I had seen in a previous photo of Mary at the KUSD studio. AHA! I then thought of the KUSD team. Lucky strike! A man with a similar hairline and jawline was pictured speaking into the microphone with a group of other young ladies. But I was unsure as to if for certain these two photos were of the same gentlemen. First look is the hairline as well as the part in the hair-a match. Second, is the eyebrows, shape, thickness, color, and arch-an almost match, but the expression was different in the photos giving the eyebrows different shapes and arches. Then I moved onto exposed wrists or ankles-weird I know-but they are easy to identify and are unique to individuals-a match. But I still had an air of hesitance to call this man Don Egert. Something just did not seem to click in my mind, there was a red flag going off somewhere in my mind. The identification of this image came down to the curvature of his ear-the curve of the helix, shape of the lobe, as well as the shape of the conch were perfect matches. I was hunched over the 1954 yearbook, magnifying glass in hand, intently comparing ear shape between the computer screen and book. To the outsider I must have look like a lunatic, but it can come down to the shape of the ear when identifying images. But as I settle into my job as a metadata enterer-fancy sounding I know-I find that looking insane and getting frustrated all lead to getting a solid identification of an image, which at the end of the day is what it is all about.
Happy identifying, Sophia

 

 

 

 

 

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Two violin treatises from the Mahoney Music Collection have been added to the digital library: L’art du violon: Ou Division des Ecoles choisies dans les Sonates Italienne,  Française et Allemande; Précédée d’un abrége de principes pour cet Instrument by Jean Baptiste Cartier

Cartier 2 Cartier

and Elementi teorico pratici di musica: Con un saggio sopra l’arte di suonare il violino, analizzata, ed a dimostrabili principi ridotta, volume 2 by Francesco Galeazzi.

Galeazzi Galeazzi title

A new collection has been added to Exhibitions. Bound and Unbound II is an international juried altered book exhibition hosted by the University Libraries. (See Bound and Unbound II in the digital library. )

Organic Form #27 by Peggy Johnston. Copyright © 2013, Peggy Johnston.

Organic Form #27 by Peggy Johnston. Copyright © 2013, Peggy Johnston.

Art becomes the eBook by Gina Pisello. Copyright © 2012, Gina Pisello.

Art becomes the eBook by Gina Pisello.
Copyright © 2012, Gina Pisello.

El Juego by Amparo B. Wieden. Copyright © 2013, Amparo B. Wieden.

El Juego by Amparo B. Wieden.
Copyright © 2013, Amparo B. Wieden.

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Peterson

Yesterday the Archives and Special Collections received a blast from the past! Andrea Peterson, who was a student assistant in the University Libraries from 2004-2007, stopped by to say hello. Currently, she is a research assistant for Senator Tim Johnson and is working on completing her master’s degree.

While employed at the Libraries, she worked on processing the USD Photograph Collection and created several finding aids for the Richardson Collection, which include: the Lewis Ellsworth Akeley Papers and the Wall Drug Papers. Andrea also transcribed a Civil War Diary that is now available electronically in the Digital Library of South Dakota.

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Corporal Walter Kasten, 1918, France. Image from Digital Library of South Dakota.

Corporal Walter Kasten, 1918, France. Image from Digital Library of South Dakota.

The following collections in the Archives and Special Collections have content about the U.S. Military.

Army Specialized Training Programs – WWII

Austin, Horace – Civil War

Beede Family – 1st Dakota Cavalry

Bellamy, Paul E. – Spanish-American War

Burton, Frederick – WWII

Civil War Diary, Union Soldier, 1861-1863

Civilian Aeronautics Administration, USD Training Program, 1939-1945

Educational Media (Ed. Media) – VHS tape of “Citizenship, Leadership, and Character: The Korean War Generation, Then and Now” September 24, 2001

VHS tape of “Vietnam Experiences” April 27, 1995

Foss, Joseph Jacob – WWII

Frost, A. S. – Spanish-American War

Moses, Lloyd Roosevelt Command Papers – Korean War and WWII

National Archives Tribal Records – WWI, Drafting of Indians 1918 and Indian Regiment 1918

Vietnam Veterans, South Dakota Oral History

Check also our collections on photographs, publications, organizations, USD presidents, other USD administrators,  alumni, and South Dakota politicians.

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D000112

X. L. A. Society, 1915, Dallas High School, Dallas, South Dakota
Fourth row [back], left to right: Peterson, Lewis, Nichols, Basil Hodson, Jansen, Watt
Third row from front, left to right: Lang, Ryokowska, Rudolph, Ticknor, Lancaster, Meyer, Whitt
Second row from front, left to right: DeVorss, Lewis, Pederson, Craven, Lona Wilson, Buroh, Olson
First row [front], left to right: McDowell, Weaver, Alta Wilson, Peterson, Jacobson

I have been working to identify these two photographs on and off for four years, if not longer, when I get a free moment or two.  Haunted by their faces, so familiar, and intrigued by the background studio setting that appears nowhere else in the collection, these photographs have stumped me for a while.

For the longest time my student assistants, coworkers and I have been trying to unlock the “XLA” clue on the banner. No national organization fit. No local organization fit.

All came together this past week.

According to the stamp on one of the photograph’s window mounts, Green was the photographer and the studio was located in Gregory, SD. Using They Captured the Moment: Dakotas Photographers 1853-1920 by Robert Kolbe and Brain Bade [Chilson Collection F651 .K54 2006], I discerned that Green was in business from 1911-1918.

“Why was this photograph in our collection?” “Why would USD students travel to Gregory, South Dakota to have their portraits taken?” Things were not making sense.

Then I zeroed in on the banner initials “DHS.” “What cities were close to Gregory?” “Dallas High School?”

Our Chilson Collection carries a book called Dallas, South Dakota: The End of the Line published by the Dallas Historical Society [Chilson Collection F659 .D15x D35].

From that moment on, things could not have been simpler. With book in hand, I turned a page and found a reproduction of the only high school annual in the entire publication. The annual was from 1915 and after the first few pages of advertisements, there was Walter Frankenfeld listed as the instructor for “Commercial and Athletics.” There were also portraits of several of the students in the photographs that I could use to match up.

Walter Frankenfeld?!”

Herman Walter Frankenfeld served as registrar at the University of South Dakota from 1926-1964. I turned back a few pages and read:

March, 1914, M. I. Ellis was hired as superintendent of schools at a salary of $1,200.00 per year. Walter Frankenfeld was hired as commercial teacher and coach at $75.00 per month. “Frankie” was rehired the following year, then went to war, and returned after the war and taught two more years in Dallas, where he met and married his wife, the former Ruth Patrick, who taught in Dallas High School. After leaving Dallas he went to the University of South Dakota where he served as registrar until his retirement.

Deeper into the reproduced yearbook, there was the photograph shown below with everyone identified. A few pages more and the other photograph presented itself also with students identified.

I learned the X. L. A. Society was founded in 1911 by Superintendent Barr:

…with Miss Henderson as sponsor. Florence Watwood was the first president and during the year much rivalry was evident between the two societies in the way of tearing down the pennants of one another and painting the interiors of the school building with their respective colors……

During the present year the members of the society have progressed rapidly along literary lines. Superintendent Ellis arranged a competition between the two societies [X. L. A. and Geilik] for better programs given during the winter months. After much hard work on the part of both societies the X. L. A. ‘s were victorious by a small margin.

The membership has increased from twenty to the present number of thirty.

We know from alumni records that Katherine Ellis (Kositsky), Earl Halverson, and Edward Prchal attended and graduated from the University of South Dakota. We also know that Frankenfeld held a long tenure here. So we have a glimpse of pre-University of South Dakota days for these folks – two photographs taken in Gregory, South Dakota.

All these years the answers were as close as the Chilson Collection. The one and only yearbook reproduced in the Dallas Historical Society publication held all the answers.

D000111

Class in Commerce, 1915, Dallas High School, Dallas, South Dakota
Back row, left to right: Earl A. Halverson, Jansen, Ward Evans, Basil Hodson, Edward Prchal, Lewis, Earl Evans, Logerwell
Front row, left to right: Katherine Ellis, Cunningham, Lona Wilson, Professor Walter Frankenfeld, Frances Ticknor, Pederson, Blanche Meyer

 

Update: Travelling from Dallas, South Dakota to Vermillion in 2014 takes roughly a little over 2 1/2 hours if taking US-18 by car. According to an account written by Faye Cashatt Lewis in “The University I Knew” published in 1973:

The train trip from Dallas to Vermillion was an all-day affair, and either going or coming it meant being at the depot at four o’clock in the morning. It involved travel in three different states. First, down into Nebraska to change trains at Norfolk, then into Iowa to change again at Sioux City, then back into South Dakota for about 50 miles, to Vermillion.

 

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Prospectus Bound and Unbound II_Page_1

The University Libraries has placed a call for submissions for Bound and Unbound II: Altered Book Exhibition. Winning entries will be exhibited from Aug. 28 through Dec. 20, 2013 and images of the work will be placed in the Digital Library of South Dakota: http://dlsd.sdln.net/cdm4/browse.php?CISOROOT=/exhibitions .

Press release: http://www.usd.edu/press/news/news.cfm?nid=2577

Prospectus: http://libguides.usd.edu/altered-entry

Some sample images from 2009’s Bound and Unbound: Altered Book Exhibition:

29 Years of Art History Copyright © 2009, John Bowitz.

29 Years of Art History
Copyright © 2009, John Bowitz

Chicken PoxCopyright © 2009, Shannon Sargent

Chicken Pox
Copyright © 2009, Shannon Sargent

Greeks and Romans Copyright © 2009, Sheryl Blackinton
Greeks and Romans
Copyright © 2009, Sheryl Blackinton

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