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Archive for the ‘History of the University’ Category

Kent Scribner Collection (MS 270) is now open to researchers.

This newly processed collection consists of the campus events from Scribner’s time as a University of South Dakota undergraduate student from 1956-1960. The other part of the collection consists of Scribner’s work at the USD Foundation mostly with the capital campaign named Campaign South Dakota.

This collection is organized into seven series: Diaries, Fraternity Materials, USD Event Programs, USD Foundation, USD Publications, Photographs, and Video Tapes.

Scribner’s collection includes his correspondence with Mary Jean (Hynes) Fine, and his role in the translation and obtainment for the Archives and Special Collections of her Native American family diaries. There are in the Fine, Mary Jean Collection of Thomas Hunter Diaries, likewise in the Richardson Collection.

Scribner also kept copies of Blast, a student magazine that includes what campus life was like in 1959 and in 1967.

This collection also includes information for the USD building dedications programs, history and videos that relate to the Buildings, Other Structures, and Utilities Collection in the University Archives.

Contact the Archives and Special Collections for a copy of the guide to the collection.

Blast Magazine

Blast, 1967 in Kent Scribner Papers (MS 270), Richardson Collection, Archives and Special Collections, The University of South Dakota

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English-Dakota vocabulary; Waśicun iapi ieska wowapi, John Poage Williamson

Chilson Collection PM1023 .W6

Oscar Howe photographs, USD Photograph Collection

Oscar Howe: the Sioux painter, University of South Dakota

USD Archives ND 237.H79 O7 1983

William J. Janklow Gubernatorial Papers, Richardson Collection

William J. Janklow Personal and Political Papers, Richardson Collection

Mamie Shields Pyle Papers, Richardson Collection

Report to the members of the visiting Congressional Committee regarding the Standing Rock Indian Agency, Fort Yates, North Dakota, E.D. Mossman

Special Collections Books

Translation of the Sioux Indian language into English; Figures, money definitions, words, sentences, etc., O.H. Bonnell

Oscar Howe Papers

University of South Dakota, 1862-1966, Cedric Cummins

USD Archives LD5073 .C85x

Vermillion and vicinity , George T. Jordan

Vermillion, South Dakota, Richardson Collection

 

New materials coming this summer!

Bound and Unbound V: Altered Book Exhibition – August 26th

Oscar Howe Photographic Materials, Oscar Howe Papers – selections from…

William J. Janklow Gubernatorial Papers – continued additions…

Mabel Townsley Papers

 

 

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Betty Turner Asher was the first woman president of any public higher education system in South Dakota. She served at USD from 1989-1996, resigning after seven years of service. At the time, her tenure was tied with two other presidents for the fourth longest term of any president at USD. Asher was previously the Vice President of Student Affairs for Arizona State University, and held three degrees: a bachelor’s in history, a master’s in counseling, and a doctorate in education.

Asher’s accomplishments while at USD are many, and some are listed here. Under President Asher:

-USD approved and began additions to the I.D. Weeks library

-Renovation was approved for the oldest building on campus, Old Main

-Construction was completed on the Health Sciences Center in Sioux Falls

-Funds were dedicated to expand the Lommen Health Sciences Library

-Enrollment hit a record high of 7,739 in 1989

-A record 1,118 degrees were conferred in May 1995

-USD Law rose to the top half of rankings in accredited institutions by the American Bar Association

-USD ranked in the top 5% of the nation’s colleges and universities, as reported by US News and World Report

-Psychology, Nursing, Physical Therapy, Occupational Therapy, Administrative Studies, Counseling, Physician’s Assistant are just some of the programs that were added or experienced growth under her leadership

Asher was known to students and faculty for her open door policy, and made leaps and bounds in improving diversity at USD. In an interview with the South Dakotan in July 1996, she states: “But I am happy that our gay and lesbian students are comfortable enough to meet openly as a group…I have received all kinds of letters and notes from the Native American community. I have been deeply touched by their response.” Asher goes on to speak about how the students and faculty make USD a success, and that she appreciated the close relationships she had with USD and its faculty and students. She recalled students coming up to her home and inviting her to join them downtown, and said that USD is where she never woke up in the morning and did not want to go to work.

Asher is the first in a short list of female leadership at South Dakota public universities. Only seven women have served as university presidents in South Dakota since Asher’s term. They are:

Peggy Gordon-Miller, South Dakota State University, 1998-2006

Kay Schallenkamp, Black Hills State University, 2006-2015

Laurie S. Nichols (interim), Northern State University, 2008-2009

Heather Ann Wilson, South Dakota School of Mines, 2013-2017

Maria Ramos (interim), Dakota State University, 2014-2015

Jose-Marie Griffiths, Dakota State University, 2015-Present

Sheila K. Gestring, University of South Dakota, 2018-Present

Betty Turner Asher’s papers are held at the Archives and Special Collections at USD.

BettyTurnerAsher

Betty Turner Asher, from USD’s Past President’s website, sourced below

Sources:

South Dakotan, July 1996 Issue

Karl Mundt Library, Dakota State University

https://www.sdstate.edu/about-us/hall-presidents

http://www.northern.edu/pastpresidents

https://www.bhsu.edu/About-BHSU/President-Jackson/Past-Presidents

https://www.usd.edu/about-usd/past-usd-presidents

https://www.sdsmt.edu/About/History/History-of-the-Presidency/

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Freshmen Initiation

Friday, September 19, 1913, otherwise known as Black Friday, the newly acquired graduating class of 1917, gathered outside of Main Hall (today one could assume they meant Old Main) promptly at 7:30 pm to begin their journey through the time honored tradition of hazing the incoming freshmen. Though this practice has gone by the way side in recent decades, the memory of the events live on in the stories that remain and a poster found while cleaning in the Archives.

The poster details the rules of decorum which the freshmen class were required to follow. As well as a large paragraph of colorful descriptions (for the time period, mind you) the upper classmen threw at the freshmen. As the poster states, any rumors that certain freshmen were exempt from the activities of freshmen initiation were utter lies and all freshmen were required to participate in any events demanded by the upper classes. In accordance with the poster laying out the rules of the initiation, the Volante followed up with tales of the event in the first issue of the Volante published that school year.  In an article titled “Initiation—Black Friday” the article’s author briefly lays out what went down and encourages the freshmen to pick up their caps at the end of the article.

The jocularity of the event didn’t last long, as two weeks later another article was published in the Volante that described a certain student who was blatantly ignoring the rules. The student body called for the punishment of the student, which led to an article that detailed the suspension of five students who brutishly and publicly tried to bring the student to heel in accordance with the rules set up for the freshmen class. A week after the first article detailing the suspensions was released, a follow up of the proceedings were published and detailed further what had caused the suspensions. As well as they would enforce the student’s suspensions until January 6, 1914, when they would be able to return to classes at the university.

The poster and volante are now on display in the archives for a limited time so stop in and read about the events that freshmen today no longer have to fear.

 

Black Friday Poster. USD Archive Oversize Material: Photographs—USD Panoramas.

The Volante. Vol. 27-30. May 1913 – July 1916.

1915 Coyote. Pg. 229

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During the 1980s and 1990s, University of South Dakota commencement program covers often presented brief descriptions of USD buildings.

 

commencement-005

 

In 2004, this building was remodeled and renamed the Dean Belbas Center. It houses Undergraduate Admissions, Financial Aid and the Office of the Registrar.

 

 

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The Faculty Woman’s Club collection has been processed and is available for research.

The Faculty Woman’s Club was a group at USD that was formed for female faculty members and wives of professors. On a program cover letter from September 21, 1954, program chairwoman Edith M. Eyres states that the Faculty Woman’s Club’s “purpose is simply to bring you and your family into the larger family of the University faculty, and to let you meet your University friends and enjoy their fellowship.”

Throughout its years of existence, the Faculty Woman’s Club has coordinated several events. Annually, they would hold a President’s reception, which was traditionally hosted at the university president’s house. Other annual events include salad luncheons, fall brunches, and spring parties. Occasionally, the Faculty Woman’s Club would arrange additional events for fundraisers. The proceeds usually went to a scholarship fund. One such event was Meeting of the Minds, which was a quiz competition that any faculty member or their spouse could participate in.

Meeting of the Minds News Story

Another charitable deed that the Faculty Woman’s Club organized was helping with the maintenance on the Danforth Chapel. They funded the insurance policy on the stained glass windows and also helped the Alumni Association raise funds for their restoration.

Below is a photograph from the dedication of a tree that the Faculty Woman’s Club donated.

Image

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Once again, Dakota Days has come. Though the festivities have begun early in the week, the parade is still an exciting highlight of Game Day. A screaming sea of red and white converges upon the Dome to cheer the Coyotes to victory. One lucky girl is crowned Miss Dakota. In the evening, merry USD students fill the streets as they wander from gathering to gathering. Here are some exciting moments in D-Day history, taken from the Volante:

On “Black Friday,” freshmen, all in their pajamas, would gather and perform an initiation ceremony involving barrel staves. D-Days was started in 1914 to stop the hazing that occurred on Black Friday. The theme for the first parade was “Frontier Life” and the floats were drawn by horses.

In the 1930’s, Sherri Cash writes in one Volante, “traditions such as the annual hockey game between university and alumnae women, the flag raising ceremony, [and] the greased pig contest between halves” were started. Sadly, these traditions have not continued into the present.

Because of the war, in 1943, there was no football game for Dakota Day and in 1944, the homecoming game was the Vermillion Tanagers versus Yankton High School.

Though it might not be that important or impressive, it is interesting to note that in 1962, students got a recess the Friday before Dakota Day.

In 1976, students got to watch “The Golden Knights” skydive before the homecoming game.

In 1984, there was an ice cream eating contest, which is my favorite past D-Days activity.

Old Main was rededicated in 1997 to kick off Dakota Days, along with President Jim Abbott’s inauguration.

There were fireworks at D-Days in 1998, along with jell-o wrestling.

Works Cited:

Volante [Vermillion] 1914-1998, n. pag. Print.

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