Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Oral History Center’ Category

– about past United States epidemics are in the Archives and Special Collections in the Health Sciences Rare Books Collection:

Carey, Mathew. A Short Account of the Malignant Fever, Lately Prevalent in Philadelphia: With a Statement of the Proceedings That Took Place on the Subject in Different Parts of the United States. 3d Ed., Improved. ed. Philadelphia: Printed by the Author, 1793. Call number WC 530 C275 1793.

Philadelphia’s yellow fever epidemic of 1793 claimed the lives of nearly 4000 people. Carrey’s book and other related histories revel a little-known episode in Black history. Due to a mistaken belief that African-Americans could not get yellow fever, many Blacks volunteered or were volunteered to care for the sick and dying. They served in all capacities, including as nurses, cart drivers, and grave diggers. At the time, Philadelphia was the temporary capital of the United States and one of the largest U.S. cities.

Other books in the Health Sciences Rare Books Collection are:

United States. Public Health Service. Preliminary Report on the Yellow-fever Epidemic of 1882, in the State of Texas. Washington, D.C., 1882. WCK U58p 1882

Fenner, Erasmus Darwin. History of the Epidemic Yellow Fever, at New Orleans, La., in 1853. New York: Hall, Clayton, 1854. WCK F336h 1854

Miner, Thomas, and William Tully. Essays on Fevers, and Other Medical Subjects. Middletown, Conn.: E. & H. Clark, 1823. WC M664e 1823

Herman P. Chilson, Hot Off the Press books, youth books, DVDs, videos, government documents, and oral history collections in the Archives and Special Collections and in the I.D. Weeks Library also have items on pandemics and epidemics.

Read Full Post »

Autobiographies by Lewis Akeley and Edward Churchill have vivid descriptions and fun stories centered around their teaching experiences at the University of South Dakota. Akeley’s book covers approximately 1887 to 1933. Churchill’s book covers approximately 1920 to 1961.

My favorite stories are Churchill’s description of the campus in 1920 and how it felt to teach evolution after the Scope’s trial of 1925.

 

campus-map-catalog-1920-B

Map from 1920-1921 USD Catalog.  Campus boundaries are Cherry Street to the north, Pine Street to the east, Clark Street to the south, and Dakota Street to the west.

 

For a more general second-hand account of USD in the 1920s, see Cedric Cummins’ book University of South Dakota, 1862-1966. He has an entire chapter on the 1920s and covers a breadth of topics. I particularly like his descriptions of student life and sports activities.

All three books are in the USD Archives and in I.D. Weeks Library. Also, the Archives and Special Collections has the papers of Akeley, Churchill, and Cummins.

Akeley, Lewis E. This is what we had in mind: early memories of The University of South Dakota. Vermillion, SD: The University of South Dakota, 1959. Call number LD5073 .A6.

Churchill, Edward P. Three thousand coyotes and I: memoirs of a zoology professor. State University of South Dakota. Vermillion, SD: State University of South Dakota, 1962. Call number QL31 .C54 A3.

Cummins, Cedric. The University of South Dakota, 1862-1966. Vermillion, SD: Dakota Press, 1975. LD5073 .C85x.

If you are curious about a later period of USD history, check out the oral histories by Chuck Estee.

Read Full Post »

ella-deloria2

Ella Deloria (1888 or 1889 – 1971) was born on the Yankton Reservation. She was “a teacher, speaker, author, and researcher in linguistics and anthropology” (Murray 1974, viii). She was associated with the University of South Dakota from 1961 to 1964 (Murray 1974, 146-149).

The Chilson Collection contains the following books that she authored, coauthored, or edited:

Boas, Franz and Ella Deloria. Dakota grammar. Sioux Falls, SD: Dakota Press, 1979.

Deloria, Ella Cara, comp. Dakota texts. New York: G. E. Stechert, agents, 1932.

Deloria, Ella Cara, comp. Dakota texts. New York: AMS Press, 1974.

Deloria, Ella Cara, comp. Dakota texts. Vermillion, SD: Dakota Press, 1978.

Deloria, Ella Cara. Deer women and elk men: the Lakota narratives of Ella Deloria. Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, 1992.

Deloria, Ella Cara. Ella Deloria’s The buffalo people. Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, 1994.

Deloria, Ella Cara. Ella Deloria’s Iron Hawk. Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, 1993.

Deloria, Ella Cara. Speaking of Indians. New York: Friendship Press, [1944].

Deloria, Ella Cara. Speaking of Indians. Vermillion, SD: Dakota Press, 1979.

Deloria, Ella Cara. Waterlily. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 1988.

She wrote several articles for the Museum News, which were published by the W.H. Over Museum at the University of South Dakota and are in the Chilson Collection:

“The Origins of the courting flute,” 1961.

“Easter Day at a Yankton Dakota church,” 1962.

“Some notes on the Yankton,” 1967.

“Some notes on the Santee,” 1967.

She also did several oral history interviews with the South Dakota Oral History Center at the University of South Dakota:

Loder, Richard, interviewer. “Oral history interview with Ella Deloria, Wallace Eagle Shield, and Sophie Many Deeds,” 1969. AIRP 383.

Loder, Richard, interviewer. “Oral history interview with Ella Deloria and J. Jeston,” 1969. AIRP 443, 444, and 445.

Some of her unpublished papers are at the American Philosophical Society in Philadelphia. Other unpublished papers were at the University of South Dakota, and then moved to the Ella Deloria Archives in Chamberlain, South Dakota. See http://zia.aisri.indiana.edu/deloria_archive/index.php.

Biographies:

Medicine, Beatrice, and Sue-Ellen Jacobs. “Ella C. Deloria: the emic voice.” In  Learning to be an anthropologist and remaining “Native“: selected writings. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 2001.

Murray, Janette K. “Ella Deloria: a biographical sketch and literary analysis. ” PhD diss., University of North Dakota, 1974.

Read Full Post »

%d bloggers like this: