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This month we say goodbye to our archivist as she moves on to the next stage of her career. She taught us many things, including how much fun cookbooks are and how these books have historical research value.

 

Cookbooks are a valuable historical source because “the study of culinary history isn’t about food – it’s about the people who prepare and consume this food.” (Sarah Lohman. Eight flavors: the untold story of American cuisine. New York: Simon & Schuster, 2016, p. xvii.

 

Below is a list of cookbooks (or cookery as the library catalog calls them) found in the Chilson Collection in the Archives and Special Collections. The books are listed from newest to oldest.

 

South Dakota’s governors residence cookbook: a culinary legacy celebrating the first families of South Dakota. Kearney, NE: Morris Press Cookbooks, 2007.

 

Gueldner, R. M. H. German food & folkways: heirloom memories from Europe, South Russia & the Great Plains. Fargo, ND: Germans from Russian Heritage Collection, North Dakota State University Libraries, 2002.

 

Spuka Sni Win. Lakota traditional and contemporary recipes. Pine Ridge, S.D.: Spuka Sni Win, 1999.

 

Luchetti, Cathy. Home on the range: a culinary history of the American West. New York: Villard Books, 1993.

 

Young, Kay. Wild seasons: gathering and cooking wild plants of the Great Plains. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 1993.

 

Walker, Barbara M. The Little House cookbook: frontier foods from Laura Ingalls Wilder’s classic stories. New York: Harper & Row, 1979.

 

Grandma’s cookbook: pioneering recipes of Northeastern South Dakota. Watertown, S. D.: Friends of the Kampeska Heritage Museum, 1976.

 

The homestead cookbook: for home and family use. Seattle: Superior Pub. Co., 1976.

 

Kreidberg, Marjorie. Food on the frontier: Minnesota cooking from 1850 to 1900, with selected recipes. St. Paul: Minnesota Historical Society Press, 1975.

 

Marquiss, Toots. Buffalo cook book. Rapid City, S. D.: Crane Publ. Co., Inc., 1972.

 

Century Czech recipes of Tabor community: Tabor, South Dakota. Tabor, S.D.: [1972?].

 

McGovern, Eleanor. The Eleanor McGovern cookbook: a collection of South Dakota family favorites. Mitchell, S.D.: Citizens for McGovern, [ca. 1970].

 

Beeton, (Isabella Mary). The book of household management. New York: Farrar, Straus, and Giroux, 1969.

 

Adams, Ramon F. Come an’ get it; the story of the old cowboy cook. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, [1952].

 

Another year with Your Neighbor Lady. Sioux City and Yankton: Radio Station WNAX, 1949.

 

Robinson, Eva Roberta. The timely cookbook. Aberdeen: South Dakota Food Administration, 1918.

 

Good things to eat and how to prepare them: over two hundred choice recipes. Buffalo, N.Y.: Larkin Co., 1906.

 

Help one another cook book. Aberdeen: Dakota farmer, [19??].

 

If you want to do research using local cookbooks, The Hilton M. Briggs Library at South Dakota State University is currently collecting cookbooks created by South Dakota schools, churches, hospitals, families, and other organizations. They are displaying them online as the South Dakota Community Cookbook Collection on the SDSU site Open Prairie.

 

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Archives and Special Collections is pleased to announce that a small selection of material from the Larry Pressler Papers has been digitized and is now available in the Digital Library of South Dakota. These documents have been selected to coincide with the recent publication of Senator Pressler’s book, Neighbours in Arms: An American Senator’s Quest for Disarmament in a Nuclear Subcontinent, for which Senator Pressler used numerous materials from his papers located in the Archives and Special Collections. These selected materials relate to Pakistan, nuclear nonproliferation, and the Pressler Amendment. Neighbours in Arms: An American Senator’s Quest for Disarmament in a Nuclear Subcontinent was published in July, 2017.

Senator Larry Pressler, born March 29, 1942 in Humboldt, South Dakota, graduated from the University of South Dakota in 1964. He later attended Oxford University (as a Rhodes Scholar), Harvard University John F. Kennedy School of Government, and Harvard Law School.  He served in the US House of Representatives from 1975-1979 and the US Senate from 1979-1997, becoming the first Vietnam veteran elected to the Senate. The Larry Pressler Papers are a closed collection housed within the Archives and Special Collections at the University of South Dakota that maintain a comprehensive account of the Senator’s life and work in service to the state of South Dakota.

The photographs featured below, as well as several others, can be found in the University of South Dakota Photograph Collection, Series 3.

LarryPressler1LarryPressler2

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One hundred years ago, South Dakota elected its first native-born governor; this governor, Peter Norbeck, proved to be one of the most progressive governors in South Dakota history. Norbeck was born in Vermillion, Clay County, on August 27, 1870. Though he did not receive an official degree, Norbeck attended the University of South Dakota in Vermillion for several terms and briefly taught school before marrying Lydia Anderson in 1900. Shortly thereafter, the couple moved to Redfield, South Dakota, in 1901, where Peter and partner Charles Nicholson formed the company of Norbeck & Nicholson, which revolutionized artesian well drilling. He entered politics in 1908, serving in the state Senate until 1915; as lieutenant governor from 1915 to 1916; as the first native South Dakotan governor from 1917 to 1921; and as United States Senator from 1921 until his death from a heart attack on December 20, 1936, in Redfield.

During his tenure as a politician, Norbeck assisted in the endorsement of many state-owned agencies, including a cement plant that officially opened in 1923 from legislation passed in 1919 and remained opened until its sale in 2001; the 1918 enfranchisement of South Dakota women; the passage of legislation in his second gubernatorial term creating the Custer State Park in the Black Hills; the development of the Mount Rushmore National Memorial; and implemented an extensive road construction program throughout South Dakota.

The Norbeck Papers, located at the USD Archives, consist chiefly of correspondence, manuscript, and print materials relating to Norbeck’s political service as governor of South Dakota and as United States Senator, though the boxes are very loosely organized. The materials span the years 1896-1936, concentrating heavily on Norbeck’s tenure as U.S. Senator from 1921 to his death in 1936. Overall, the collection can be broken into three general categories: political correspondence, financial materials, and personal materials, including correspondence with members of Norbeck’s family, trips, and copies of speeches. Additional materials include a box of books, a box of photographs, an individually wrapped scrapbook, and 3 oversize maps.

The South Dakota Oral History Center, located on second floor of I. D. Weeks Library, has several oral histories that recall Peter Norbeck. Many of the interviews include a discussion of what South Dakota was like in the early 1900s and include topics such as Governor Norbeck, the flu epidemic of 1918, the Nonpartisan League, Prohibition, and the Norbeck-Nicholson firm in Redfield, South Dakota.

For more information, visit the Archives and Special Collections to look at the Peter Norbeck papers (MS 116) today – including the attached photographs of the first native-born South Dakota governor.

 

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The Archives and Special Collections will be closed May 29 for Memorial Day and May 30-June 2 for re-carpeting.

The third floor of the ID Weeks Library may be inaccessible for periods of time in May.  Please use the east stairwell to access the Archives or stop by the circulation desk for directions.  Please contact the Archives for more information if you are planning on visiting in May or if you have any questions.

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The Archives and Special Collections will be closed May 29 for Memorial Day and May 30-June 2 for re-carpeting.

The third floor of the ID Weeks Library may be inaccessible for periods of time in May.  Please use the east stairwell to access the Archives or stop by the circulation desk for directions.  Please contact the Archives for more information if you are planning on visiting in May or if you have any questions.

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In honor of the 50th anniversary of the I.D. Weeks Library building, the Archives and Special Collections has organized a special exhibit to display the changes of the USD library through the years, from the beginning of the university in 1882 through today.

The first exhibit on the second floor of I.D. Weeks focuses on a specific aspect of the library’s construction – Operation Book Lift, which was held in April 1967. Of particular note is an actual fabric bag that was used by USD students and faculty to help haul books from the original library building from 1912 to the new library building.

The second exhibit, outside of the Archives and Special Collections room, focuses on the role of women throughout the library’s history. Several women were head librarians and some even had the role of dean. Another aspect discusses the large donation by a Sioux Falls woman, including a rare 1817 edition of Homer’s The Iliad, and the final aspect analyzes the discrimination against USD’s female students.

The final and biggest portion of the exhibit is a timeline of the library. Though most of the library’s original books were destroyed in a massive fire in 1893, students, faculty, and community members donated books to help the university’s library to grow. In 1912, Andrew Carnegie donated a library building, allowing the library to be housed in its own place for the first time since the university’s founding. After various expansions and renovations, and a rise in students, President I.D. Weeks (who was president of USD from 1935-1966) reached out to the Board of Regents in hopes to build an entirely new library building to house the library’s almost 300,000 volumes. The new library opened in spring 1967 with an official dedication in fall 1967.

Over the next few months, the exhibit will be on display; for those unable to view the exhibit in person, photos will be attached with this post! For more information regarding the exhibit or any of the materials used, please visit the Archives and Special Collections on third floor for a list of the collections consulted.

 

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Freshmen Initiation

Friday, September 19, 1913, otherwise known as Black Friday, the newly acquired graduating class of 1917, gathered outside of Main Hall (today one could assume they meant Old Main) promptly at 7:30 pm to begin their journey through the time honored tradition of hazing the incoming freshmen. Though this practice has gone by the way side in recent decades, the memory of the events live on in the stories that remain and a poster found while cleaning in the Archives.

The poster details the rules of decorum which the freshmen class were required to follow. As well as a large paragraph of colorful descriptions (for the time period, mind you) the upper classmen threw at the freshmen. As the poster states, any rumors that certain freshmen were exempt from the activities of freshmen initiation were utter lies and all freshmen were required to participate in any events demanded by the upper classes. In accordance with the poster laying out the rules of the initiation, the Volante followed up with tales of the event in the first issue of the Volante published that school year.  In an article titled “Initiation—Black Friday” the article’s author briefly lays out what went down and encourages the freshmen to pick up their caps at the end of the article.

The jocularity of the event didn’t last long, as two weeks later another article was published in the Volante that described a certain student who was blatantly ignoring the rules. The student body called for the punishment of the student, which led to an article that detailed the suspension of five students who brutishly and publicly tried to bring the student to heel in accordance with the rules set up for the freshmen class. A week after the first article detailing the suspensions was released, a follow up of the proceedings were published and detailed further what had caused the suspensions. As well as they would enforce the student’s suspensions until January 6, 1914, when they would be able to return to classes at the university.

The poster and volante are now on display in the archives for a limited time so stop in and read about the events that freshmen today no longer have to fear.

 

Black Friday Poster. USD Archive Oversize Material: Photographs—USD Panoramas.

The Volante. Vol. 27-30. May 1913 – July 1916.

1915 Coyote. Pg. 229

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