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Archive for the ‘USD Archives’ Category

East Hall was built 130 years ago in 1877. It was the third building constructed on our campus.

 

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This image and description of the East Hall appeared on the cover of the 1981 commencement program. During the 1980s and 1990s, USD commencement programs often highlighted USD buildings. The Archives and Specials has an almost complete set of commencement programs from 1889 to 2016.

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On April 26, 1963, The University of South Dakota became the official name of our university here in Vermillion. It was called the State University of South Dakota in some documents and the University of South Dakota in others. The State Board of Regents of Education designated the later.

 

USD logo, 1960s

From “University of South Dakota Designated Official Name.” The University of South Dakota Bulletin. Series LXIII, Bulletin no. 11, Alumni No. 5, May 1, 1963.

Alumni publications are one of my favorite sources of USD history. The title does change over time (Alumni Quarterly, South Dakota Alumnus, University of South Dakota Bulletin, Dakotan, and South Dakotan, for example), but they are kept in the archives as one collection.

 

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1890-usd-faculty

 

Several University of South Dakota faculty from the 1890-1891 school year pose for their portraits.

 

Pictured left to right:

J. A. Ness, B.A., professor of the Greek language and literature

H. Schmidt-Wartenberg, M. A., Ph. D., professor of the modern languages

George S. Thomas, M. A., Ph. D., professor of Latin language and literature

Gerhardt C. Mars, M. A., professor of the English language and literature

Lorrain S. Hulburt, M. A., professor of mathematics and astronomy

Mary E. Allen, B. A., associate professor of Greek language and literature

Fred W. Speirs, B. S., acting professor of history and political economy

Garry E. Culver, M. A., professor of geology and mineralogy

Henry E. Kratz, Ph. M., Ph. D., professor of the science and art of teaching, and principal of the normal department

— USD Photograph Collection, “Catalogue of the University of South Dakota for the year 1890-91,” University of South Dakota.

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science-hall-demolition-1960-1961

 

Science Hall under demolition (1960-1961) with a replica of the first log schoolhouse built in Dakota Territory in 1864 by the Dakota Calvary, Company A, under the direction of Captain Nelson Miner, on the left.

— USD Photograph Collection

 

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Women Mathematicians

 

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The USD alumni newsletters are fast becoming my favorite source for USD history. To be useful, these newsletters need an index or to be in a searchable format unless, like me, you are looking for random and interesting tidbits about USD.

An example of a random and interesting article is “U.S. Naval Weapons Lab likes girls from South Dakota” in University of South Dakota Bulletin, Alumni no. 9, series LXIII, no. 25, October 1, 1963. It highlights women with mathematics degrees from USD who have been hired by the lab. This article reminds me of Rise of the Rocket Girls and Hidden Figures, recent fascinating books about women mathematicians in the early U.S. space program.

The alumni newsletters can be found in the Archives and Special Collections.

 

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Growing up just a half hour away from Mt. Rushmore, I can tell you that the beauty and grandeur is as great as the hype about it is. Though as a Rapid City native I have not visited the monument as often as one would guess, really I can count on my hands and feet the number of times I have been there (that I can really remember). To me, it is one of those places in which, less is more. I have a greater respect for the monument now that I am older and not living within its shadow.

To think that 75 years ago, the Mt. Rushmore the world knows today, was but an idea a large group was working to cultivate. That Gutzon Borglum and his team of carvers began work on the face of Washington. The project was in the works from 1927 when carving began to 1941, when what is now the finished project was unveiled, after the death of Borglum. Throughout the years of carving, many made journeys to see the monuments work in progress, including two US presidents Calvin Coolidge and Franklin Delano Roosevelt.

Today the monument attracts visitors from all over the globe. They are amazed by the monumental size of the sculptures, and by the beauty of the visitor’s center which gives an abundance of information on the monument. One of the prominent reasons for visiting Mt. Rushmore would be the lighting ceremony held at the end of every night. This is a major part of the monument and during the ceremony, park rangers leading the ceremony ask that any and all former and active duty service men and women take center stage. This part of the ceremony is the most moving point and as each member of the military explains who they are and which war they were a part of, there is little to no noise as this is a moment of thanks to those in service. Another great reason to visit Mt. Rushmore is the ice cream, or so I’ve been told.

The biggest lore surrounding the monument is the famed Hall of Records that is located behind the head of Lincoln. The room does exist though it is not found behind the head of Lincoln but off to the side of the monument.

Within the University of South Dakota’s Archives and Special Collections, there are 19 collections that contain information regarding Mt. Rushmore, and the process in which it took for the monument to be built, including papers between those who helped fund, sculpt, and shape the monument and visitors center in the modern beauty that it is today.

If you would like to know more about those involved and the process that they went through to create the monument, come visit the Archives and Special Collections to see the display for Mt. Rushmore or ask about the collections that discuss Mt. Rushmore. The display will be up and ready for viewing by November 1, 2016.

And as a friendly reminder, if visiting the monument, take a moment to stop and smell the pine trees, you never know if one will smell like vanilla, chocolate, butterscotch or strawberry.

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