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Our book must have been striking when it was new in 1892 with its bright red velvet covers and shiny metal filigree corner embellishments.

Title is Perlen aus der Instrumenten-Sammlung von Paul de Wit, Leipzig, published in 1892 and is in our Mahoney Music Collection. The English title is Pearls from the instrument collection of Paul de Wit, Leipzig (Saxony).

The National Archives sponsors #ArchivesHashtagParty once a month, and December’s topic is #ArchivesSparkle. NARA invites archives to submit tweets about anything that glitters in their archives.

On this election day, Archives and Special Collections has added a list of Dakota Territory’s governors and delegates and a list of South Dakota’s governors, U.S. senators, and U.S. representatives to its online site.

If you notice any misspellings or other errors, please let us know.

image showing location of link

The link will take you to:

LibGuide homepage introducing lists of Dakota Territory governors and delegates; and South Dakota governors, U.S. senators and U.S. representatives.

The location of South Dakota politicians’ archives can be found in The Plains Political Tradition: Essays on South Dakota Political Culture, Volume 3. This book is in the Chilson Collection.

On November 7, 1922, South Dakotans were asked to vote whether to move the University from Vermillion to Sioux Falls. This initiated law lost, and it had the lowest yes vote of any initiated law in the years analyzed by Alan Clem, i.e., 1889-1960 (page 35).

Shown in the image are the constitutional amendments (CA) and initiated laws (IL) on the South Dakota ballot in 1922. These were extracted from Table 10 in Clem’s publication (page 37-38).

Information and table from Clem, Alan L. South Dakota Political Almanac: a Presentation and Analysis of Election Statistics, 1889-1960. Vermillion, S.D: Governmental Research Bureau, State University of South Dakota, 1962. This book is in the Chilson Collection and in the Governmental Research Bureau Collection at the Archives and Special Collections.

Discussions about this vote can be found in the 1922 Alumni Quarterlies and Volante student newspapers. These publications are also in the Archives and Special Collections.

image of handwritten recipe

I found this handwritten recipe in a cookbook in the Archives and Special Collections. What does it make? Who put it there? Does cathup equal ketchup? Is there still shredded wheat in the breakfast food aisle?

I have to use it soon and find out what it makes. Meatloaf? Meatloaf Appreciation Day is October 18th.

The recipe was found between the pages of Good Things to Eat and How to Prepare Them. Buffalo NY: Larkin Co., 1906, which is in the Chilson Collection. Many cookbooks on a wide variety of topics can be found there.

The Forgotten Pool

The Forgotten Pool

Few people remember a pool in the 1929 newly constructed two-story armory and gymnasium building at the University of South Dakota (USD). The New Armory, as the building was called, was designed by renowned Sioux Falls architects Hugill and Blatherwick to serve two purposes: as a military armory and a replacement for the Old Armory (now Belbas Larson Center) women’s gymnasium.  Besides serving as a venue for indoor athletics, the New Armory also housed military equipment and uniforms, classrooms and offices, and the basement contained a shooting range.

              According to his papers, President Slagle was intimately involved in the construction of the building which started construction in 1928. A letter from the architects to President Slagle noted specifics about the swimming pool located on the southeast portion of first floor. A February 5, 1929, Volante article describes the building as 100 by 200 feet. It was large enough to accommodate three basketball courts. The tiled swimming pool was 25 by 75 feet with room on one side for spectator bleachers. Not only did the pool serve USD students and faculty, but Vermillion citizens were also welcome. Pictures of the Dolphins, a women’s swimming group can be found in several Coyote yearbooks from the 1950’s.

Plans of the New Armory 1st floor. (Archives and Special Collections)               

                                         

Picture of Dolphins in the swimming pool. Note the tiling. (Coyote Yearbook, 1955)

In 1929 an outdoor pool was constructed in Prentis Park, but it was only operational in the summer, making the New Armory pool available for swimming all year round. Over the years with the increase in student enrollment and growth of athletics, a new structure to house athletics was built called the DakotaDome that opened in 1980. The function of the New Armory also changed as it became home to South Dakota Broadcasting (E. O. Lawrence Telecommunications Center) and USD Military Science Department. In 2003 the building was again renovated and became the Al Neuharth Media Center which is home to the Department of Media and Journalism, the Volante, Freedom Forum, KYOT TV and KAOR radio stations, and South Dakota Public Broadcasting. The pool is still there covered in sand, but not forgotten.

USD campus maps 1960-2016

Enjoy finding the changes in the USD campus from 1960 to 2016. These maps are from the USD Undergraduate Catalogs and are as close to 10 years apart as possible. Most of the graduate and undergraduate USD catalogs can be viewed at the Archives and Special Collections.

USD campus map 1960
from USD Undergraduate Catalog 1960
USD campus map 1970
from USD Undergraduate Catalog 1970
USD campus map 1979-1980
from USD Undergraduate Catalog 1979-1980.
1989-1991 campus map
from USD Undergraduate Catalog 1989-1991
1998-2000 USD campus map
from USD Undergraduate Catalog 1998-2000

from USD Undergraduate Catalog 2016-2017

USD campus maps from 1901 and 1912 are on a July 31, 2019 blog post.

Although both the W. H. Over Museum and the National Music Museum (NMM) have distinctly different items they collect and the NMM is part of the University of South Dakota (USD), whereas the W. H. Over Museum resides on the USD campus, but is not part of USD, at one time both called the Carnegie Library building home.

The USD Carnegie Library construction was finished and occupied in 1911 when USD enrollment was 425 students according to Cummins’ book (Cummins, Cedric C. The University of South Dakota, 1862-1966. Vermillion, SD: Dakota Press, 1975). By the later part of the 1930’s USD student enrollment doubled, and President I. D. Weeks promoted the enlargement of the building.  On Thursday, October 10, 1940, dedication exercises for the expanded library were held. The major addition, constructed of Indiana Bedford limestone, doubled the capacity of the building.

Twenty years later, enrollment doubled yet again necessitating the construction of a new library on campus. This would become the I. D. Weeks Library. In 1967 President Weeks suggested that the W. H. Over Museum, founded in 1883 by the Board of Regents known as the University Museum, occupy the old Carnegie Library building. The Over Museum had occupied several sites on campus including University Hall, the Science building, and the basement of Slagle Hall.

 In 1967, not only did Over call the Carnegie building the Over Museum’s home, but space was given to a newly hired music professor, Arne B. Larson who brought with him over 2,000 instruments. Most instruments were initially stored in Old Main.  In addition, prominent Yanktonai Dakota artist and professor Oscar Howe had his studio and a gallery in the Carnegie building. He was also assistant director of the W. H. Over Museum. 

In 1973, Andre’ Larson, Arne Larson’s son, founded and became director of the Shrine to Music Museum and the Center for the Study of the History of Musical Instruments which included his father’s collection donated to the University of South Dakota. Andre’ Larson was a consummate collector of rare and important musical instruments, books, documents, and other ephemera.

By the early 1980’s the Shrine to Music Museum was expanding and President Joseph McFadden did not renew the Over Museum’s lease for the occupancy of the Carnegie building in 1984. In addition, in 1980 Oscar Howe retired from the University and in 1983 passed away. The consequences were that the Shrine to Music Museum acquired the entire Carnegie building (AMIS newsletter Vol. xv, No.2, June 1986, Dedication of the renovated Shrine to Music Museum). By contrast, Friends of the W. H. Over Museum, raised funds to build a new museum located east of the DakotaDome. The Chair of the fundraising committee for nine years (1984-1993) was General Lloyd Moses.  In 2001, the Shrine to Music Museum changed its name to the National Music Museum and in 2018 major renovations to the Carnegie building commenced including construction of a new wing. In 2022, a ribbon cutting signaled the completion of the construction project, although developing the exhibits in the Carnegie building is ongoing.

In 2023, the W. H. Over Museum will celebrate its 140th year and the NMM its 50th year. Stay tuned for their celebrations.

Photograph thanks to Dr. Margaret Banks illustrating the enlarged Carnegie Library building in 1983 when it served as home for the Shrine to Music Museum, the W. H. Over Museum, and Oscar Howe’s Gallery. Note the lighter limestone addition to the rear of the original building.

Read about the Archives and Special Collections new digitization project in the latest issue of South Dakota Magazine (September/October 2022).

We have added three items to the Digital Library pertaining to early Dakota Territorial history:

1st Dakota Cavalry, Company A, descriptive book, Captain Nelson Miner


Descriptive book of Company A of the 1st Dakota Calvary (U.S. Army) containing soldiers’ names, physical traits, places of birth, and dates of enlistment. The descriptive book dates from the Civil War era and serves as a roster of the men who enlisted to serve in the Dakota Territory between 1862 and 1865. Organized in 1862 during conflicts between Indigenous peoples and settlers, Company A mustered out in 1865.

Scrapbook of newspaper clippings, 1863-1864, John Blair Smith Todd


A scrapbook of newspaper clippings, 1863-1864, reflecting the history of the Dakota Territory, especially the military and political events of the territory. John Blair Smith Todd, a delegate to the U.S. Congress from the Dakota Territory, created the scrapbook from articles published in the Sioux City Register, the Dakotian, the Omaha Daily Nebraskian, the Congressional Globe and the Dakota Union.

Ledger, Dakota Territory, 1869-1872, Cuthbert DuCharme

A bound manuscript ledger reflecting the sales of goods, including alcohol, at a trading post maintained by Cuthbert DuCharme on the Missouri River near Fort Randall in Dakota Territory, or present-day Charles Mix County, South Dakota. The ledger contains daily entries between 1869 and 1872. Also contains a list of DuCharme’s property as of 1857.
Picture postcard with air view of Prentice Park, Vermillion, SD.
Image is an undated postcard from: South Dakota postal cards. A collection of cards of early South Dakota, CHILSON COLLECTION. F656 .S63x.

Do you see the park’s baseball field and the swimming pool on the postcard above?

Vermillion is collecting stories about the park for the celebration. We will happily forward any stories you send to us to the committee collecting the stories.

Help us assign a date to this postcard. We know it is after 1936 and before late 1950s because the caretaker’s house in the park is present but the water tower is not. Please also contact us if you know who took the picture or made the postcard.

Undated postcard from: South Dakota postal cards. A collection of cards of early South Dakota, CHILSON COLLECTION. F656 .S63x.

This year, make a trip to Mitchell to see the Corn Palace and/or visit our Archives and Special Collections to read about the once common Corn Palaces:

1976. Schutt, Robert. The Corn Palace Story: with a Description of Early South Dakota and Mitchell, and a Map Indicating South Dakota Indian Reservations. Dakota News. CHILSON COLLECTION. F659.M5 S39x.

1981. World’s Only Corn Palace. Goin Co. CHILSON COLLECTION. F659.M57 W67 1981.

2005. Nygard, Travis E. Oscar Howe and the Metaphorical Monarchy on Maize: Indigenism and Power in the Mitchell Corn Palace Panels, 1948-1971. Thesis (M.A., Art History). University of Pittsburgh. SPECIAL BOOKS. NA6750.A2 U62 2005.

2010. Nygard, Travis E., and Pamela H. Simpson. “Indians at the Corn Palaces : Race and Reception at Two Midwestern Festival Buildings.” Buildings & Landscapes. SPECIAL BOOKS. NA6750.A2 U63 2010.

2012. Simpson, Pamela H. (Pamela Hemenway). Corn Palaces and Butter Queens: a History of Crop Art and Dairy Sculpture. University of Minnesota Press. SPECIAL BOOKS. NA6750.A2 U6 2012.

Check out this online story about Oscar Howe, the painter, and the Corn Palace:

2016. Zimny, Michael. Gallery Documents Oscar Howe’s Long Legacy at the Corn Palace. South Dakota Public Broadcasting. https://www.sdpb.org/blogs/arts-and-culture/gallery-documents-oscar-howes-long-legacy-at-the-corn-palace/ (accessed 07/29/2022).

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